Metal Detector Reviews

Bounty HunterCobraDetectorProFisherGarrettMinelabMP DigitalPredatorTitanViperWhite'sAll PurposeBeachGoldRelic$50 to $199.99$200 to $399.99$400 to $599.99$600 to $799.99$800 to $999.99$1000 to $100000
Minelab Excalibur II
*****
Richard Bunch writes "I have been detecting for 20 years. I detected in school yards, around old farm homes, in older residential..."
Minelab X-Terra 70
*****
Squy Wallace writes "I selected the Minelab X-Terra 70 because it is very light weight and meets my requirements for frequent..."
Minelab Quattro MP
*****
Ricky Nichols writes "I’m a newbie when it comes to metal detecting, and had wanted to get into it for quite a while. So..."
White's DFX
*****
Robin Loev writes "I enjoy searching for coins, especially old and obsolete coins. I have had about five different metal..."
White's XLT
*****
Jack Walling writes "I managed to come up with the money to purchase a Whites XLT from Kellyco after many hours of searching..."
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Metal Detectors By Aardvark
Featuring the top 10 selling metal detectors & Fast & Easy Checkout
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*****2 Reviews
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***1 Review
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Metal Detector Reviews

  Total # Reviews = 3
  Average Rating = 4.33 / 5

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
< 1 >
16 of 48 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Megan Dumitru
User Experience:
Newbie
Submitted on:
Apr 18, 2008
User Rating:
*****


I am 51, an economist by profession and a treasure hunter by passion.
Treasure hunting is a fascinating domain.

About 10 years ago, I joined a group of treasure hunters by chance, and since then, this passion has been continuously growing. At that moment, I came in contact with the basic notions used in this field, e.g. treasure, a term with many meanings, referring in this case to gold and silver objects.

I found out that throughout time various persons, from statesmen and organizations to common people, had hidden certain valuable goods which for several reasons remained hidden and forgotten, only to be later discovered as a result of archaeological surveys, by chance, or, in most cases, as a result of treasure hunting activities.

My first steps as a treasure hunter were difficult, with many failures and many holes dug for nothing, so I decided it was a far more complex business than I first thought and that I needed information and research, so I started to read and become informed.

My conclusions are that in treasure hunting there are 3 basic steps to follow:
1. Researching historical sources and local tales about hidden treasures and family heirlooms, in order to establish the probability of their existence, their general location, and how big they should be.
2. Establishing the perimeter where the treasure is most likely to be located. In this stage, paranormal searching methods may be used: clairvoyance, induced telepathy, radiestesy. So, in 1995 I took radiestesy lessons, and by analyzing my failures, constant training and progress, I am confident that I can tell if there is a treasure in the area.
3. Pinpointing the exact location of the treasure, by using a metal detector.

When I started looking for a good metal detector I came across Kellyco's web site. I liked this site because it's accessible, its design and management are first-rate, it has the widest range of products available, the prices are the best that I could find, and you can get very good field consultancy.

In December 2008, I bought a high-performance metal detector from Kellyco, a Minelab GPX 400. I started using it last month, in order to see how it works and to get used to it. I noticed that it cannot fully discriminate between ferrous and nonferrous metals, namely that it's not silent when detecting ferrous metals, it just makes another type of sound, which makes it difficult to use in areas with a lot of iron objects, e.g. in a house.

I think that an accurate examination of the perimeter may require various types of metal detectors, so I intend to buy another one from Kellyco in the future.

I have already determined the location of my first treasure by means of radiestesy and using the detector I bought from Kellyco, and I intend to bring it to light as soon as possible.

Megan Dumitru
Drobeta Tr.severin, Mehedinti, Romania Europa

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49 of 52 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Steve Morrisey
User Experience:
4-6 years
Submitted on:
Mar 17, 2008
User Rating:
*****


After using the Minelab Eureka Gold for several years, and having good success in fields, parks and schools, but limited success in the popular gold fields of Arizona, I started thinking about upgrading to a better gold detector.

The week before Thanksgiving my wife and I were invited to Australia the following year for a wedding. Not wanting to give into going to a wedding too easily I decided that in order to go I would need to purchase a new detector. My wife agreed and I made some calls and ordered the Minelab GPX 4000. It arrived the day after a light snow, so I spent the next day or two going over the manual and some DVD information that I had purchased at the same time.

Several weeks later, after familiarizing myself somewhat with the controls and functions, I headed for Arizona to meet with some friends.

I arrived there fairly early and set up camp as quickly as possible, wanting to play with the GPX before the others arrived.

The first thing that I noticed was the sensitivity of the machine. Old miners and and campers had left a large amount of old cans, nails and other metallic junk laying around. The GPX was screaming every time I came near any debris left on the surface.

I decided to walk a little ways away and found an area to work that was not too trashy.

Within 30 minutes I got a signal that was just a little fainter than the surface junk had been giving me. I did not expect anything more than some more trash but after digging down about eight inches I hit upon a small quartz rock that sent the GPX screaming, Clearing off the mud and dirt, gold bits started appearing all over the rock.

Within thirty minutes of starting out, I found my first nugget. This was in a place that has seen hundreds, if not thousands, of detectorists comb through the same desert area.

This may not be a very technical review, but regardless of the bells and whistles, if you can't find what you are looking for it doesn't do you any good.

This machine found what I was looking for and found it in a trashy, over detected area.

That is what counts. I would recommend this to anyone who is serious about gold detecting.


Steve Morrisey
Penrose, Co

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23 of 38 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Roy Milliken
User Experience:
7+ years
Submitted on:
Mar 21, 2008
User Rating:
***


When I first started using my Minelab GTPX-4000 metal detector, I relied more on the meter than the different tones it was sending out. As time went on and my eyesight started to fade I started paying more attention to the different tones it was sending out.

After mastering all the different tones my machine was sending I started to realize that even though the meter was extremely accurate the engineers had made it to work at it's peak using both visual and audio. together this machine was literally a turn on and go machine perfect for the newbie. I think that treasure hunting has always been in my blood when metal detectors first came out my wife and I were still newlyweds and like most newly weds we didn't have much money to spend so three or four hundred dollars to buy a metal detector was out of the question at least for a couple years.

By the time we had saved up enough money to buy a machine they had improved drastically. If you wanted to you could crank up the discrimination to knock out all signals by slowly reducing the discrimination you would start picking up more and more metal. Bottle caps and pull tabs would be the first thing you would pick up as you turned down the discrimination. The lower you went the more trash you would pick up. On most machines if you are using discrimination you are going to pass over nickels and gold. that are in once an area has been cleaned out switch to all metal this takes a lot of time but I have a lot of older coins and gold rings this way
Roy Milliken
Cambridge, Oh

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